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Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)
on leaks by edward snowden. in a moment we will be joined by journalist glenn greenwald who first broke the snowden story. first, we turn to saturday's protest in washington. it was organized by the stop watching us coalition. jesselyn radack, a former justice department who now works for the government accountability project, read a message from edward snowden. >> we are here to remind our government officials that they are public service -- servants. this is about the unconstitutional, unethical, and immoral actions of the modern- day surveillance state, and how we all must work together to remind the government to stop them. know,bout our right to our right to associate freely, and to live in a free and open democratic society. [applause] witnessing an american moment in which ordinary people from high school to high office stand up to oppose a dangerous trend in government. we are told what is unconstitutional is not illegal. but we will not be fooled. we have not forgotten the fourth amendment in our bill of rights prohibits government that only from searching our personal effects
snowden. the former national security agency contractor who released thousands of classified documents about government surveillance in one of the most significant leaks in u.s. history. he's been charged with espionage and has been living in russia under temporary asylum. the american journalist at the center of the story lives in brazil. >> we've had to come to rio to speak to glenn greenwald. he hasn't returned to the united states since he broke the story about the nsa surveillance programs for fear of being prosecuted. >> the nsa's goal really is the elimination of privacy globally. it is literally a system designed to monitor all forms of human behavior inside the united states, which is the ultimate surveillance state. >> last december, glenn greenwald received an email from a person who didn't identify himself. >> we still didn't know who he was, where he worked, but he was saying he had access to large amounts of very sensitive surveillance information that show the united states government was violating the law and abusing it's power. >> suddenly in my lap had dropped some of
. in the stream of new revelations from the snowden documents, it can be hard to grasp. sure, the government is collecting information, but what does that really mean for someone's life? to find out, we went to a meet a group of people who definitely know they're being spied on. >> after 9/11 it wasn't just the nsa that increased surveillance on u.s. citizens. here at the city level in new york, the nypd actually brought in two senior officials from the cia to help run a program to spy on its own citizens. >> the program, which was uncovered by the associated press, is targeting one community: muslims. secret documents show that the nypd is conducting surveillance of entire muslim neighborhoods and infiltrating dozens of mosques and muslim student groups. >> they visited bookstores, they visited cafes, they visited hookah joints, and of course they visited mosques... >> informants record conversations using hidden microphones, collect the names and phone numbers of congregants and even photograph them. >> they were listening for, you know, what were people talking about, how were they reacti
security agency is under fire because of revelations by former nsa analyst, edwin snowden. s scongressman james sense en brenner is expected to propose a new law, the freedom act, which would stop dragnet collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and .a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights but director of national intelligence james clapper and general keith alexander told the schmidt the content of phone calls remain secret in a virtual lockbox unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that, they say, is rare. >> there wiat would only be loo when we had reasonable and articulable suspicious that we had connection to a foreign al-qaeda or related terrorist group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 88 such selectors that we could go and look into that. >> that's it. of the billions of records, only 28 yeah. >> at the committee hearing, there was relatively little discussion about allegations the u.s. had spied on america's allies but at the whitehouse, it was still a hot topic. press secre
beinget ward snowden and guess what he's going to do? guess what his job is? well i'll give you a hint. he's working, it involves computers, you' give you has hint. i'll let diana magnate tell us. what job did you find in russia? >> reporter: i wish i could give you the name of the company he's working for but we got off the phone from his lawyer an tolly ku kucharena but he says it's a major russian website and works tomorrow november 1st. it seems the lawyer has been consistently saying ever since he was granted asylum at the beginning of august he wants to lead a normal life, there were some photos which came out recently of a man looking like edward snowden doing his grocery shopping and now it seems he's got himself a normal job. but it's likely given the fact that he's an i.t. specialist he's not going to be sitting in some big room with a load of other techies, he's probably going to do it remotely. there are security concerns around him, so he's probably not going to be very clear or very public about where he's working from. >> it sounds like he's going to stay in russia, forever
. >> the work of the n.s.a. is under fire, because of revelations by former n.s.a. analyst edward snowden. documents he leaked revealed the n.s.a. has been collecting phone calls and text messages of millions of american citizens. the author of the patriot act has proposed a new law called the freedom act aimed at ending the sweeping phone tapping program. the act would stop drag net collection of phone calls of american citizens, place stronger restrictions on who is targeted and appoint a special advocate to the super secret fisa courts to protect privacy rights. national security director told the committee the content of phone calls remain secret, in a virtual lock box unless there is a link to possible terrorism and that he says is rare. >> they would only be looked at when we had reasonable and articulatable suspicion that we had connection to a foreign or al-qaeda terrorists group and look into that box. in 2012, we had 288 such selectors that we could go and look into that. that's it. of the billions of records, only 288. >> at the hearing, there was relatively little discussion a
, ever since edward snowden exposed them. calls to rein them in grew louder when it was revealed the u.s. was eavesdropping not only on enemies, but allies. on capitol hill two of america's top intelligence officials made an impassioned defense and here's homeland security correspondent bob orr. >> reporter: the director of national intelligence today confirmed the n.s.a. has long spied on friendly foreign leaders to understanding the thinking of both enemies and allies. >> it's invaluable to us to know where countries are coming from, what their policies are, how that would impact us across a whole range of issues. >> reporter: german chancellor angela merkel has accused the u.s. of monitoring her personal cell phone. senate intelligence committee member, republican susan collins, said today that's inappropriate. >> there's absolutely no justification for our country to be collecting intelligence information on the leaders of some of our closest allies. >> reporter: but before the house intelligence committee, clapper was unapologetic. >> some of this reminds me a lot of classic movie
for the country. appropriate?back guest: it is safe to say the snow back -- the snowden relation did -- revelation caused blowback. host: he was a game changer in all this, would you agree? caller: i think so because this is one of the greatest leaks and compromises in american intelligence in our history. it is the equivalent of giving the other team our playbook. going to be looking back on the snowden years for years to come, perhaps as a point when some of our collection capabilities don't. we will have to ultimately see what the price we will pay for that is greater -- is. snowdenter the revelations came out, people now know about them, and yet this week even some legislators have said that it comes to the point where we talk about angela merkel, it may have changed the perception to even some on .apitol hill perhaps we need to bring more oversight into what is going on at nsa? i support aggressive oversight of the intelligence community. this is the deal we struck as a country. we have democracy. it is not necessarily completely in harmony with an aggressive intelligence community. we have h
constitutional rights? no, they don't. it would be accurate to say that snowden was acting as a lib rare research -- he took the research books for the home. >> and longer. >> and longer. did he violate his constitutional oath by revealing to the detriment of united states national security interest classified information? he did. were his actions illegal? >> they were. >> mr. snowden's actions unconstitutional. >> that i were. >> did mr. snowden put at risk america's national security interests? >> they did. did mr. snowden's illegal unconstitution ?iewgal revolution help the terrorists to seek to kill americans? >> i believe they will. i would say they have and they will. >> it was recently state -- yes. >> or even as we speak? >> yes. woe have reason to believe whether it's germany, france, or brazil or any wonderful ally it's reasonable to believe they historically have or currently listening to the united states or are leaders? >> that's correct. is it common for those not united states allies russia or china or iran it would be reasonable to conclude listen to the united states or leaders?
analyst like mr. snowden? if you believe this can be done technologically to move the data and allow them to retain their data in rekeying get all the affirmation behalf -- which information why wait for legislation to require it? why not go to the fis a court order to say we will go to the communications providers with a selective and we have reason to believe it is connected to a plot? why not to tell the country we hear you we make this restructuring we can get the information we need in a way that is more protective of the privacy concerns that have been raised. >> the issue working there to be sure i answer this exactly right to buy right now we have to have the stain to zero -- a change in statutes i believe with the service providers that is where you come we could not get them to keep the data the courts could not do that as i understand it. >> correct. no statutory requirement to keep it for the length of time that we looked at either three or five years at is a separate piece of legislation to give us that longevity. >> by about of time. >> i just want to clarify the record that
. >> and to foreigners have american constitutional rights? in -- >> no, they don't. is it safe to say that mr. snowden was an analogy who took analogy of an librarian who took research books home who did he violate his constitutional oath by revealing to the detriment of the united states national security interest facet but information? >> he did. >> were his actions illegal? >> they were. >> were they unconstitutional? >> they were. -- >> did. snowden mr. snowden put at risk america's national security interest? >> he did. illegal,s unconstitutional revelations help the terrorists who seek to kill americans? >> i believe they will. i would say they have and they will. >> it was recently stated by a leader in europe that it is not done. is it your experience that allies of the united states have spied on the united states historically? >> yes. >> or even as we speak? >> yes. >> we have reason to believe that whatever it is, germany or france or spain or brazil or any other allies, it is reasonable that we are listening to the united states or leaders. >> that is correct. whos it common for those are
with the former vice president dick cheney. cheney says edward snowden is "a traitor." plain and simple. my asthma's under control. i don't miss out... you sat out most of our game yesterday! asthma doesn't affect my job... you were out sick last week. my asthma doesn't bother my family... you coughed all through our date night! i hardly use my rescue inhaler at all. what did you say? how about - every day? coping with asthma isn't controlling it. test your level of control at asthma.com, then talk to your doctor. there may be more you could do for your asthma. for those nights when it's more than a bad dream, be ready. for the times you need to double-check the temperature on the thermometer, be ready. for high fever, nothing works faster or lasts longer. be ready with children's motrin. ♪ [ male announcer ] eeny, meeny, miny, go. ♪ ♪ more adventures await in the new seven-passenger lexus gx. lease the 2014 gx 460 for $499 a month for 27 months. see your lexus dealer. for $499 a month for 27 months. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. on
these mistakes all this information. youess my question is, know, mr. snowden is supposedly the source of all of this information, and we have talked you all before about the level he was at and how he would have knowledge.f i know some of the things being put out are not true. as has already been stated here, we know that. it is kind of like fighting with .ne hand tied behind your back mean -- is how -- i this just stuffy is making up or was this stuff going on while he was at nsa? >> congressman, he had one of ouraccess as website administrators in hawaii. it was not that he had knowledge, because he clearly didn't understand things about how these tools actually operate, and you can see the misperception from what was .tated collection on a european country had nothing to do with collection on a european country. his job was to administer a website that brought information to nsa hawaii. he did not have access to fisa data or business records to 15 or some of our more sensitive -- to he did get great access the core of our reporting, and he took a lot of that data with him, and he has shar
snowden continue to keep on coming. just as the white house is fending off reports that president obama knew the n.s.a. was eavesdropping on german chancellor's personal phone calls, the latest bomb shell is this. n.s.a. reportedly monitored 60 million phone calls made in spain in just a single month. that's according to documents leaked by snowden. spain is summiting the u.s. ambassador to the country demanding an explanation. steve has more on this story. >> this controversy just keeps widening. spab now summoning the u.s. ambassador on monday to discuss these allegations of spying on spanish citizens that it said could break what's become a climate of trust between the two countries. now, if proved true, it could be a diplomatic problem for the u.s. and spain. earlier the spanish newspaper said the n.s.a. had recently tracked over 60 million calls in spain. that in the space of a month alone. citing a document that was part of a paper by contractor edward snowden. this comes amid the political fire storm over whether president obama was informed that the german prime minister's phone
released by edward snowden and said a few things about it. one, not the nsa listening in on this call data. it was the nsa, the u.s. and all of its nato partners. the cold data had nothing do with the spanish and french but a collection of call data listen -- listen to it in a number of countries in support of military operations. he said it is completely false. one, this was the msa doing this and, two, it was european citizens, french, and spanish citizens that were being listened to. pretty aggressive knockdown of that story and some of the source of some of the greatest criticism from european side of nsa surveillance. >> jim, part of the white house pushback has been everybody does it. clapper also saying that foreign countries also spy on the u.s. so -- looking at that further, is it possible that the president's blackberry is being read by the germans or the british? >> i asked this of a former official yesterday. i was being -- he said, sure. they probably go after it. i don't know if they would have success. nsa has advantages. but one of the points that mike rogers made in this h
. >> so let me ask you this. was the leaker in question, ed snowden, was he a traitor? >> you're asking me? >> yes. >> absolutely. >> would that be the opinion also of general alexander? is that your opinion? >> absolutely. >> mr. engliss? >> yes, ma'am. >> and mr. cole? >> he's been charged not with treason but certainly leaking and compromising the integrity of our intelligence system. >> in your opinion, mr. cole, would he be considered a traitor to the united states? >> this is a matter that's -- >> just your personal opinion. >> unfortunately as a justice department official where there's a case involved, it's difficult for me to do that under the rules of professional responsibility. >> does the white house consider mr. snowden a traitor? >> i think best to ask -- you say the white house collectively. i think most people feel that he's done a great disservice to the country. >> i yield back. >> could i just make sure -- i want to make sure i answered all the snowden thing. i answered them quick. if i could just ask the deputy attorney general just to make sure i hit those all right.
on and on and on. one assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and suprt the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and beli
based on the information leaked by former nsa contractor edward snowden. reports deny that president obama knew that nsa was spying on angela merkel. >>> news executives are in a london courtroom charged with tackinhacking phones and bribing officials. the trial is expected to run through spring. >>> there is a new glitch playing the affordable healthcare website. the data hub is down halting online enrollment. that hub went down on sunday. it's key in determining eligibility for tax credits which can reduce the cost of those monthly insurance problems. the problem was caused with a connectivity issue at a center operated by verizon. those are your headlines. consider this i"consider this" e have news 24 hours a day at www.aljazeera.com. fought by antibiotics. is it too late to catch up and infections. >> a look at america's conspiracy theories with brad melt zer. did bobby kennedy take his brother's brain and how long was the fbi tracking lee harvey oswald before the assassination. >> wing suit flying is a deadly sport. mountains. >> i'm antonio mora, welcome to "consider this." we
on to say that media outlets have misinterpreted documents that were leaked by edward snowden. and much of the data from europe was collected by intelligence agencies of our allies. they collected the phone records said general alexander and shared them with the u.s. >>> u.s. special forces reveal they were just hours from embarking on a dangerous covert operation earlier this month to capture a major benghazi terror suspect. special forces were ready if ordered to capture ahmed abu khattala. the mission never materialized. partly because there was so much publicity inside libya and the western press about another raid in libya just hours later. that raid led to the capture of suspected al qaeda operative abu anas al libi in tripoli. and he's in u.s. soil. >>> maliki will meet with president obama on friday. he is asking the u.s. for more counterterrorism aid and he'll also discuss purchasing american-made apache highlights and other equipment. senate leaders are warning that maliki is leading america back to civil war and he's who tao receptive to the influence of iraq and iran. >>> bo
the firm whose background checks helped nsa leaker edward snowden and aaron alexis get clearances. they are accused of failing to perform quality control reviews in its investigations of potential government workers. >>> check out the white house. it's getting beautified or boo-tified for halloween. lit up in orange and purple lights. decorated with jack-o'-lanterns and cobwebs. imagine if the white house is in your neighborhood. what are we going to get? >> a long security line. >> that's true. >>> coming up on "new day," we heard the apologies from kathleen sebelius, the vice president. why? obvious, the obama care website. they're pledging to get it fixed. the question, is that enough. >>> and the startling new accusation against the nsa. the agency says it was not peering into yahoo! and google databases. what it is not denying is raising more questions. (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses
classified information from ex-nsa employee edward snowden. added if they don't stop doing so "it will be very difficult for government to stand back and not to act." bret. >> james, thank you. >>> answers are still hard to come by in the investigation into last fall's benghazi terror assault. last night one of journalisms heavy hitter confirms what we knew and had reported on. correspondent add day housely has the latest from los angeles. >> reporter: it's been more than a year since the attacks on benghazi and still information provided by the state department, military, cia and the white house has been incomplete, contradictory and fails to answer many questions. >> a lot of responsibility, a lot of ownous that needs to be taken up and accounted for. >> reporter: but accounts have been tough to come by. as witnesses claim they've been threatened and in some cases forced to sign nondisclosure agreements. fox spoke last may with an american special operator who witnessed the attack. >> i don't blame -- you know, it's something that's a risky especially in our profession to say an
by edward snowden. and that slide showing she is numbers in millions and so on. but in fact, the nsa collected no information in europe. they say that any information, any of this metadata, that's what it was just metadata. not phone calls or content. was done by european intelligence services not by the nsa. and that in fact it was nof of citizens of those countries, france and spain, but collected from a number of sources by the u.s. and nato allies in support of military operations abroad. here's how they made that case at the hearings today. >> assertions by reporters in france, lemond, spain, el mundo, italy espresso that new york sa collected millions of phone calls are completely false. to be perfectly clear, this is not information that we collected on european citizens. it represents information that we and our nato allies have collected in defense of our countries and in support of military operations. >> so in effect they're saying there that one of the strongest reasons for this anger we've been seeing from europe started with nothing, the misinterpretation, erin, of a si
edward snowden is reinforcing the notion that u.s. spying spreads wide and goes deep. the latest bombshell, partly denied by the obama administration, appears in the "washington post." it says u.s. intelligence agencies have gained access to hundreds of millions of google and yahoo user accounts by secretly tapping into company data centers. late today, six top tech companies-- yahoo, google, aol, apple, microsoft and facebook-- sent a letter to congress, calling for enhanced privacy protections. barton gellman broke the story for "the washington post." welcome, bart gellman, how are you? welcome to the newshour. what is the difference between what you're reporting that happened and what the white house and the administration is pushing back at and saying didn't happen? >> well, there have been several versions of it but so far they have not denied any of the facts stated in the story. yesterday general alexander, the head of the n.s.a., denied that the n.s.a. is tapping into the servers or databases or data centers of google and yahoo! that's not what we said. what we said is th
assumes this is why edward snowden -- this is his plan. but there doesn't seem to be a great deal of defense for the nsa from people that you know full well, if we were to have a terrorist attack, the first question they would be asking is why was your spying efforts, your surveillance efforts, not ubiquitous, universal and intense. what do you think? >> well, you're absolutely right. first, alexander -- general alexander, i know him very well, was with him last night at an award dinner here, we gave him an award, and he's just a first-rate general officer, but more important than that, a first-rate intelligence officer and spy. he's absolutely hands down the best we've ever had in this job. he's been in it for eight years. and he's leaving of his own volition to get a new set of eyes, it's time. it truly is unfair. these allegations, a lot of these things make no sense. and certainly they are left to deny and support the nsa themselves. they and clapper, the director of national intelligence, that is who is defending this major function that protects the united states and believe
think it is ridiculous that snowden knew we were spying on merkel that obama did not know. the -- hecked it was was the executive of the government. for him not to know anything that is going on in this government is ridiculous. i think it shows his lack of experience. the syrian thing and the redline. the nsa really needs to stop monitoring americans, especially in secret and it has no place in america. the same opinion -- that is eugene robinson's column in "the washington post." we will keep getting your phone calls on this this morning. " notinghington times the one-year anniversary of superstorm sandy. that in "the washington times closed quote this morning. in capitol hill, -- "washington times" this morning. the house ways, and means committee at 10 a.m.. the new york times says the leader will be in the hot seat. a picture of the medicare chief there. "usa today closed quote has this on their headline -- "usa today" has this on their headline -- "the washington times" has this piece this morning -- also up on capitol hill, there will be a memorial service for tom foley at 3 p.m.
.s. government been reprimanded or fired that led to snowden stealing those documents and releasing them publicly? >> i can't say for certain. i believe there have been individuals who have gone through their adjudication process for reprimand. again, still going lou the processes of what exactly happened. i do think that some individuals have been held accountable for their actions when it came to how it came about we came to this information. putting in place the proper protections so that this can't happen again. >> thanks so much for joining us. >> thanks, wolf. >>> just ahead, ready and waiting for kathleen sebelius, the republican congressman, fred upton. he chairs the panel that will grill the health and human services secretary on the obama care rollout tomorrow morning. we will get a preview. we have new evidence the obama care website was headed for syria's problems before its rollout. that's coming up in our situation room special report. obama care under fire. tweet us. use the hash tag, simply. ♪ tracks! they connect the factories built along the lines. and that means jobs, lots of
't know about it until nsa leaker edward snowden revealed the u.s. was spying on other allies including leaders of mexico and brazil. the president says just because the nation's spy agencies are able to listen in on phone conversations doesn't necessarily mean they should. >> we give them policy direction but what we've seen over the last several years is their capacities continue to develop and expand and that's why i'm initiating now a review to make sure what they're able to do doesn't necessarily mean what they should be doing. >> reporter: the state department says the nsa spying disclosures have raised what they call a spokeswoman called significant challenges in some of these country's most important relationships and partnerships. brazil's president canceled a state visit over the snooping. jenna? jenna: worth pointing out editorial pages for conserve-leaning, liberal-leaning writers taken issue with this. some president's critics calling him the bystander president. why is that? >> reporter: the republican national committee strung together a group of problems that seemed to h
the course of the snowden matter, i can't find any reason to complain to any of you at the table about a lack of notification, a lack of information that you have provided us. i think you have -- if i have a problem with nsa is you provide us with too much information and we have to understand it, and actually your very good about helping us understand what's going on. >> you didn't say "security," and i don't know, it's one thing to talk about the privacy of the records that you expect some other architecture to maintain, but what about a foreign intelligence service that says, ha, there's a fat target, let me go after that. >> sir, i think you are right. i include that in security, it's inherent in the protection of privacy from all inappropriate accesses whether that's someone who has authorized access who might misuse that and whether it's read from afar. >> it may be a different architecture also makes for a more inviting target. >> i agree, sir. >> okay. director, i want to zoom back out for just a second here and just think a little about the context of what we're talking about. a coup
Search Results 0 to 34 of about 35 (some duplicates have been removed)

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